A mere splinter of wood, metal, and horsehair.

What a tour, what a tour! I’ve been sitting at the airport, catching my breath from this whirlwind tour with a huge iced coffee. Last night’s final show was good! The church folks over at the First Parish Church of Newbury were super nice and supplied our hungry bellies with homemade asparagus soup, salad, bread, wine, and baked goods. Who knew churches could transform into public music venues? Yes, there were pews. Yes, there were a lot of white older people swaying back and forth. Yes, there were bibles. Yes, there was an awful lot of God. Yes, there were no colored gel lights or pretty carpets or spectacular sound system. However, did I already mention the baked goods?

After the dinner and show, we went straight back to our bed and breakfast and defrosted; mostly getting on our computers and zoning out.

We dropped off our van a little earlier at Boston Logan. I was the first to be dropped off at my terminal. As I hugged everyone, I said, ‘Good Riddance!’ with a smile. Boy were we all glad to be done with the tour.

I’ve learned a lot from this journey. Here is my list of things I’ve learned on my one month journey in no particular order:

-I’ve learned a lot about touring; the logistics and organization/disorganization of it. I’ve learned what musicians need to be happy, sane, and satisfied and how to communicate in a professional manner when not all things are able to be professional.

-I’ve learned to play a genre of music I was afraid of playing for looking like a hack (still sort of hacky but not terrible). Playing my version of jazz has only made me feel more respectful (and jealous) of apt jazz musicians.

-I’ve learned to smile and have a good time on stage, even if it’s a bad day. I never paid much attention to pleasing my audience and my bandmates because it was all about me and Violiny..but perception is everything. Why would I be doing it if I wasn’t having a good time anyway?

-I’ve learned how to share a bit better. I was constantly learning to adapt and share with other people-sharing food, rooms, a bed, and space. It has been 10 years since I toured with a group in this capacity, and it is not always easy. But I did it, and noone got hurt.

-I’m gradually letting things go, where ever I may be. My everyday stresses come along with me- traveling to another land won’t diminish them but sometimes escalate them.

-I’ve learned to be grateful for my ability to make people smile, cry, and really feel something via a mere splinter of wood, metal, and horsehair.

-I’ve learned to be grateful for time, for free food, for warmth, for friends, for family and friends far away who believe in my ability to try new things (tear) and succeeding.

This concludes my travel blog for this tour. I probably won’t be blogging much after this, but who knows? Thanks for taking the journey with me.


Done! Last show.

Done! Last show.


Asparagus soup. Thanks church ladies at First Parish Church of Newbury! Glad we rocked you and glad for the free eats.

Asparagus soup. Thanks church ladies at First Parish Church of Newbury! Glad we rocked you and glad for the free eats.


Well, the tour is winding down. It’s the last day of this tour! We stayed the night at the Knight’s Inn in Natick, MA and played a show at Amazing Things. Afterwards, we went to dinner at Uno’s Pizzeria-I used to live in top of a Uno’s. This particular one had these little gps menu devices right at the table! Strangely enough we still had a waiter.

I received a nice compliment from a woman last night; ‘You give that violin a voice’-funny enough, it’s the second time I received that compliment. I’m glad people can hear me through Violiny. It’s the voice that I communicated (and still communicate through) when I lacked the ability to.

Currently driving to the Greenleaf Inn in Newburyport, MA in a wintery blizzard listening to stand up comedian Mitch Hedberg.

Well, the tour is winding down. It’s the last day of this tour! We stayed the night at the Knight’s Inn in Natick, MA and played a show at Amazing Things. Afterwards, we went to dinner at Uno’s Pizzeria-I used to live in top of a Uno’s. This particular one had these little gps menu devices right at the table! Strangely enough we still had a waiter.

I received a nice compliment from a woman last night; ‘You give that violin a voice’-funny enough, it’s the second time I received that compliment. I’m glad people can hear me through Violiny. It’s the voice that I communicated (and still communicate through) when I lacked the ability to.

Currently driving to the Greenleaf Inn in Newburyport, MA in a wintery blizzard listening to stand up comedian Mitch Hedberg.


Wow! Look at this 2 sided painting with violin right through it!!

Wow! Look at this 2 sided painting with violin right through it!!


Jamming in the green room at Amazing Things in Natick, MA before sound check.

Jamming in the green room at Amazing Things in Natick, MA before sound check.


Played Trumpets in New Jersey yesterday! Not much of a crowd, but the owner was a phenomenal jazz harmonica player and sat in with us. We also got free pasta, salad, and beverages. The days of playing for your food are always here to stay! Afterwards, we visited Dunkin Donuts, and mostly chilled. I played Poker with Chris, our bass player and am now happy to have laundry money.

Played Trumpets in New Jersey yesterday! Not much of a crowd, but the owner was a phenomenal jazz harmonica player and sat in with us. We also got free pasta, salad, and beverages. The days of playing for your food are always here to stay! Afterwards, we visited Dunkin Donuts, and mostly chilled. I played Poker with Chris, our bass player and am now happy to have laundry money.


I met up with my sister Lucy on my last night in New York at Cororon-a soba noodle place on the lower east side/chinatown the size of a phone booth that held no more than 20 people. One has to step outside to let other people spill out. We had something called ‘dip’ soba in which you choose from an assortment of soups. There’s cold soba noodles on the side which you then dip into the concentrated soup and enjoy. I ordered the chicken burdock, and Luc had the pork kimchee. We shared a green tea ice cream topped with green tea, mochi and cornflakes. Really strange but delicious! There was no better way to spend a freezing evening huddled over soup and conversation.

I met up with my sister Lucy on my last night in New York at Cororon-a soba noodle place on the lower east side/chinatown the size of a phone booth that held no more than 20 people. One has to step outside to let other people spill out. We had something called ‘dip’ soba in which you choose from an assortment of soups. There’s cold soba noodles on the side which you then dip into the concentrated soup and enjoy. I ordered the chicken burdock, and Luc had the pork kimchee. We shared a green tea ice cream topped with green tea, mochi and cornflakes. Really strange but delicious! There was no better way to spend a freezing evening huddled over soup and conversation.


I went to see my Aunt Katie in Long Island for a few hours. We had lunch at Whole Foods, chatted with her friend who had the cutest daughter and German Shepard named Eazy.

I went to see my Aunt Katie in Long Island for a few hours. We had lunch at Whole Foods, chatted with her friend who had the cutest daughter and German Shepard named Eazy.


Williamsburg, hipsters, my sister, a candy store.

I’ve been living in Williamsburg, Brooklyn for 3 days now, and couldn’t be having a better ‘vacation’. Williamsburg is best compared to LA’s Silverlake area/San Francisco’s Mission District. Basically a gentrified area with lots of shops, restaurants, yoga studios, and hipsters looming about. This is the neighborhood I would be living in if I were to move here.

I’ve been doing double sessions at the Williamsburg Bikram Yoga which is a 10 minute walk from our hotel, have a crazy addiction to Wild Ginger pan-asian vegan food on Bedford, and hang out in different coffee shops all day long musing about life.

This is similar to what I do in LA anyway, but after a long tour consisting of playing 15 shows, spending most of my time in a car or hotel with the quintet, being cold and sick….this is a welcome break.

When we got into Brooklyn Sunday, we all poured out of the car-anxious to explore the city/see friends/get out of each other’s faces. Mostly, to get out of each other’s faces. I missed a yoga class I was planning on attending, so I rode the train to Union Square in city, and saw a Whole Foods which I eagerly scuttled into. I decided to chill in my room which I had to myself for the night.

I share a room in the little hotel conveniently located near my favorite part of New York as of late. It’s supposed to be a luxury boutique in the ghetto. Our room is quite small but I am not complaining. My twin bed is very clean and comfy and I really enjoy the citrus scented lotions and soaps along with a great view of the BQE (Brooklyn Queens Expressway).

Yesterday, I got acclimated with Williamsburg again, practiced yoga, met up with my little sister, Lucy and played a show at Pete’s Candy Store. Luc and I met in front of the venue and went around the corner to Beco, a sweet Brazillan restaurant that felt a little like a greenhouse (it’s been very rainy and humid outside). I had a Moqueca, a shrimp stew dish. Luc had Feijoada, a meaty dish with lamb. And we each had a Caipirinha, which was a treat (not drinking much these days). We had a chance to catch up; it’s been a year? She is such a beautiful girl, tall with saucer-like eyes, with sweet charm and a real passion for living. Kind of like me, except I’m short and stumpy, ha ha.

Afterwards, we went to Pete’s Candy Store and enjoyed listening to the opening act; Astrid Nora. Nora’s a Danish cellist/singer with a haunting voice and loop pedal. Pete’s was a real candy store in it’s day; much like other New York venues…Pianos on the lower east side (a former Piano Bar) and Arlene’s Grocery (a former grocery store). Luc’s friend came to see the show; what a nice guy. A bespeckled vegetarian that plays guitar-yes, how could I not approve? George Cole Quintet went next. I won’t mention specific band members, but not everyone was excited and happy about the indie music venue as I was. Playing theaters with a few hundred people is alright, but nothing makes me feel more at home than a dark joint playing indie music with less than 10 people watching. We ended up unplugging, going straight to the audience of said 10 people, and sitting on chairs among the audience a la jam session. That was something we’ve never done. It was super fun; lots of creative solos from everyone, and a fine way to spend the evening.

We have 1 more day left in Williamsburg before we head to New Jersey to play a gig at Trumpet’s. I plan to check out some music tonight, ride the Long Island Railroad to see my Aunt Katie tomorrow, and then eat dinner with Luc again.

Sad face!